Cheating and Bullying Using Cell Phones and PDAs: The Dark Side of Mobile Technology

By:
Dr Karen E Smith,
Dr. Orest Cap,
Jim Welsh
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Technology use in Canadian schools formerly meant simply thinking about the integration of computers. Current technology use in schools has broadened to include mobile technology such as handhelds. Mobile technology provides students with enhancement of their learning environment, providing them with a real-world perspective. The workplace and institutes of higher learning are experimenting with this technology as they sort out its possibilities and problems. There are many using this technology that believe it may soon replace current computer technology consisting mostly of desktop and laptop computers. As learning becomes more mobile, these technological innovations become more common place and their advantages become evident. Despite the increasing use of mobile technology and the exploration of its potential, there are also a number of social issues that form a dark side of this technology. For example, school divisions are forced to establish policies about mobile technology use in light of the fact that it could increase the potential for cheating and bullying. This paper examines the issues of bullying and cheating using handhelds and cells phones through the results of a survey of 150 teacher candidates, 50 faculty advisors, and 150 collaborating teachers. The findings and correlated literature review suggest that the preeminent front on the subject is a need for greater teacher awareness and informed knowledge about mobile technology. The paper also addresses how schools might raise awareness about the potential problems associated with mobile technology.


Keywords: School Culture, Bullying, Cheating, Handheld Devices, Teacher Education
Stream: Teaching and Learning, Cyberspace, Technology
Presentation Type: Paper Presentation in English
Paper: Cheating and Bullying Using Cell Phones and PDAs


Dr Karen E Smith

Assistant Professor, Curriculum, Teaching and Learning, University of Manitoba, Faculty of Education
Canada


Dr. Orest Cap

Professor of Education, Curriculum, Teaching and Learning, University of Manitoba, Faculty of Education
Canada


Jim Welsh

Assistant Professor, Curriculum, Teaching and Learning, University of Manitoba, Faculty of Education
Canada


Ref: H05P0509