From the Desert to the Digital: Sites of Practice in the Visual Arts

By:
Dr. Jane McFadden
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In the 1960s, an expansive visual culture and emergent information technologies influenced a rich and variant body of art that had profound epistemological implications. This paper investigates shifting forms of cultural experience in this decade — specifically the interdisciplinary practice of artists (Walter de Maria, Robert Morris, Yoko Ono, La Monte Young) who looked to music, film, and performance as models for spatio-temporal experience in the visual arts. Their practices both explored the limits of authentic experience, offering art presented in overwhelming landscapes or delivered at distracting decibels, while also producing work that circulated on television or in satellite photographs. By exploring diverse forms of cultural experience and their relationship to meaning, these practices address the foundations of visual knowledge. Grounded in the material and experiential realm of culture, this work also suggests the need for new art historical methodologies (of which this paper may serve as one example) that move beyond the theoretical categories of the modern or the postmodern. At stake is the need to understand, rather than limit, emergent models of knowledge from this decade, which in turn provide a lens on the continually more complex possibilities of meaning and experience in the culture of the twenty-first century.


Keywords: Visual Arts, Site-related Sculpture, Avant-garde Music, New American Cinema, Performing Arts, Walter de Maria, Robert Morris, La Monte Young, Yoko Ono
Stream: Aesthetics, Design, Knowledge, History, Historiography
Presentation Type: Paper Presentation in English
Paper: A paper has not yet been submitted.


Dr. Jane McFadden

Assistant Professor of Art History, Graduate Program in Fine Art, and Graduate Program in Theory and Criticism, Art Center College of Design
USA

Jane McFadden, (B. A. Duke University, M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin) is an assistant professor of art history at Art Center College of Design. Her work focuses on the interdisciplinary practices of the 1960s. She has published on Edward Kienholz and Walter de Maria, among others. She is currently working on a book on Walter de Maria and the complex forms of sculptural experience in the 1960s.

Ref: H05P0390