Bringing Subjugated Knowledge Forms into the Academy

By:
Dr. Mekada Graham
To add a paper, Login.

This paper explores two key areas; first, the intellectual hegemony that surrounds definitions of knowledge in the academy. Although many academic circles have drawn attention to issues of equality in society they have largely failed to explore the role of different forms of knowledge in institutions of learning. There is a pressing need for academic knowledge to speak to diverse experiences and understandings of the world. Second, this paper engages in conversations about marginalised knowledge forms that serve as an important intellectual resource for individuals and communities. Recent developments in social theory have had an important influence upon the sources and claims to knowledge. In the light of post modern challenges to conventional knowledge forms, this intellectual project has opened up spaces for voices long silenced and excluded in academic discourse.

Over many years, black and minoritised scholars have been engaged in recovering past histories and philosophies as a way of reconnecting with their cultural antecedents to assist in cultural renewal and community building. These knowledge forms integrate the realities of everyday experiences and local knowledge that guide social living (Dei, 2000). This paper draws upon the philosophical and spiritual understandings of 'Maat' as an important resource base in helping communities to affirm their spiritual, emotional and intellectual potential and experiences. While these aspects of cultural knowledge can have special meaning for people of African descent, they encompass spiritual and humanistic values towards social transformation and human excellence.


Keywords: Subjugated knowledge, Intellectual hegemony In the academy, Power and knowledge, Cultural knowledge, Communities
Stream: Knowledge
Presentation Type: Paper Presentation in English
Paper: Knowledge Representation in Social Work Education


Dr. Mekada Graham

Assistant Professor, Department of Social Work Education College of Health and Human Services, California State University, Fresno California
USA

Dr Mekada Graham is a Professor in the Social Work Education Department at California State University, in Fresno. She teaches social policy and social research. She has published articles in several scholarly journals in the UK and USA including the British Journal of Social Work, Social Work Education and the Journal of Black Studies. Her research interests include critical social theory, social policy issues, African-centered approaches to social work, social work philosophy and values, spirituality. She is currently a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Black Studies, (Sage Publications) in the USA. Mekada's publications have highlighted the need for new theoretical frameworks that encompass the values and cultural heritage of black people of African descent as action orientated strategies for social change.

Ref: H05P0279