Visual Communication in the Century of the Brain: New Directions in Understanding the Meaning of Images

By:
Dr. Ann Marie Barry
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Without doubt, the most significant growth area of knowledge related to the study of the Humanities today lies in the realm of neuroscience and the way the brain processes information, appreciates its meaning, and decides to act on it. While sociological approaches have given us a wide range of understandings on the impact of visual messages, it will ultimately be neuroscience which will prove to be the solid analytical foundation upon which theories of the future are built. This verbal and visual presentation will define visual and verbal imagery in neurological terms, review the most significant areas of neurological visual processing, give an overview of how what we see becomes meaningful, and review the necessity of developing "visual intelligence" in response to our visual culture.


Keywords: Visual Communication, Neurology, Image, Visual Ethics
Stream: Knowledge
Presentation Type: Workshop Presentation in English
Paper: Perceptual Aesthetics


Dr. Ann Marie Barry

Assoc. Prof. of Communication, Boston College Department of Communication, Boston College
USA

Ann Marie Barry is the author of Visual Intelligence, The Advertising Portfolio, and various articles and creative works in the neurology of the image, graphic design, and media studies. Her works have been adopted as essential reading in numerous colleges and universities, and she is a recipient of the Distinguished Research Award of the International Visual Literacy Association, of the National Communication Association Visual Commission Award for Excellence in Research, and of the NBC/Carnegie Institute National Teacher's Award for her work in media education. Her background is multidisciplinary, including an M.A. in English, an M.S. in Mass Communication, and a Ph.D. in Perceptual Psychology, Literature and Film. She is a Capstone and Communication professor at Boston College, where she teaches courses in Visual Communication Theory, Advanced Visual Theory and Aesthetics, and Visual Design.

Ref: H05P0174